The designer who dresses the stars

OM Style Avenue AW 17-31424

Media personality Bonang Matheba wears Orapuleng Modutle Style Avenue.

THE glamorous dresses worn by the likes of Bonang Matheba, Terry Pheto and Nandi Madida on red carpet events takes a lot of work.

They begin in the imagination of talented designers, who use celebrities as muses or brand ambassadors. South African couture designer Orapeleng Modutle is currently in the forefront when it comes to dressing some of our leading ladies for his label, Orapeleng Modutle Style Avenue.

“I get to dress some of the country’s top celebrities, an opportunity that is not afforded to many young designers,” says Modutle

“I have always wanted to dress Bonang Matheba because she is one of the best dressed red carpet queens. I have dressed all the celebrities that I have wanted to dress locally such as Ayanda Thabethe, Minnie Dlamini.

 

OM Style Avenue AW 17-30106.jpg

Artist Nandi Madida

“The women that I dress form in line with the product that I deliver and they get attracted to the quality of the style that I deliver. It’s really knowing how to stick to your clientele and quality and craftsmanship is also very important,” he says.

“Internationally, I would love to dress Jennifer Lopez and Kendall Jenner.”

I met Modutle before his African Fashion International Mercedes- Benz Fashion Week Cape Town showcase.

The collection, titled “Rose Garden Wedding”, features subliminal gowns in sequins, chiffon, satin, structured corsets.

The designs are complemented by embellishments such as flowers, pearls, lace, feathers and hats by Anita Ferreira designs. The theme of the collection says

“Royalty is getting married and they have invited their elite family members and friends. The collection caters for the attendees, the mother of the bride and bridal party”. 

OM Style Avenue AW 17-31728.jpg

Modutle said: “It’s a day of fun, people are wearing hats, butterflies on their hair and big gowns… taking couture to another level.

“Our previous collection was very playful, our clientele was very young, she wore crop tops and shorts.

“The couture fashion scene in SA still need to grow, we need to educate our clients about the design and production process, the craftsmanship and the behind-the scenes that goes into creating a couture garment.

“Some of my favourite international designers that I look up to for inspiration includes Tom Ford and Elie Saab and locally Gavin Rajah and Gert-Johan Coetzee are amazing at couture,”he says.

 

Modutle, the Tshwane University of Technology fashion graduate, developed his love for fashion and attention for details while watching his mother and grandmother do needle work.

OM Style Avenue AW 17-31229.jpg

“I used to watch them hand stitching and that caught my attention from when I was about eight- years-old – that’s when I also developed my love for sketching.

“The first item I made in varsity was a pencil skirt, which took me a whole two weeks to make. My big break came when I interned with Khensani Nkosi of Stoned Cherie. That was an amazing experience and she is the pillar of where I am now.

“I learnt a lot about how she ran her business. She taught me that fashion is not all about the glitz and the glam,” he says.

OM Style Avenue AW 17-32011

Describe the Orapeleng Modutle Style Avenue woman?

“She is between the ages of 20 and 60. She is a romantic. She exudes opulence and luxury. She is the kind of woman that will wear a pencil skirt with a slit paired with with a feather jacket to work,” he says.

OM Style Avenue AW 17-30358.jpg

His advice for aspiring designers:

“You need to learn the skill of design, your talent is not enough. Once you know the skill get an internship. It’s very important because you will be working with other people who have been in the industry longer than you.”

OM Style Avenue AW 17-32131.jpg

● Connect with Orapeleng Modutle Style Avenue on instagram @Orapelengmodutle.

Photography Credits: Creative direction: Rich Mnisi. Styling: Bee Diamondhead Photographer: Apart Verrips. Hats: Anita Ferreiradesigns. Make-Up Artist: Muzi Zuma. Flowers: Amor Flowers South Africa.

Connect with me on Instagram @Nontando58 https://www.instagram.com/nontando58/?hl=en

Read more of my work at http://www.IOL.co.za http://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/style

This piece was first published in Top of The Times on May 29 2017.

 

When fashion meets decor

joedan-10

Eduan Roos, Tamara Chérie and Leandri de Leeuw collaborated for aCREATE and Chérie Spring/Summer 2016/2017. PICTURES: JOE DAN PHOTOGRAPHY

COLLABORATION is now a common buzzword in fashion, art and design. Brands,
creatives and influencers are coming together to share ideas… curating content that is specifically relevant for their consumers.

The latest collaboration is between creative décor specialists, Eduan Roos and Leandri de Leeuw of aCREATE, an award-winning contemporary readyto- wear brand, Tamara Chérie. The collaboration, which was part of aCREATE and Chérie Spring/Summer2016/17 showcase titled “A Common Thread”, was presented at the Roodebloem Studios in Woodstock last month. It saw the coming together of interior design and fashion in a beautifully curated way.

JOEDAN-1.JPG

The two brands’ aesthetic of muted palettes and minimal styles complemented each other well, expressing clean lines and refined silhouettes articulate in a chic modern attitude.

Previously part of The Aleit Group , Roos and De Leeuw recently ventured out on their own to form aCREATE, and over the past months have made a name for themselves as the go-to-designers for bespoke event experiences in Cape Town and Joburg. Their furniture pieces offer customised décor and accessories that interpret their vision for each unique
event.

JOEDAN--68.JPG

The local events industry has evolved over the years, with clients now demanding service that not only sets them apart, but also delivers enduring memories for their guests, Roos explains when I met him and De Leeuw at Chérie’s studio in Gardens.

Roos, a fashion designer by profession, says the slow living trend has spilled over from lifestyle to décor and design.

“There is a big Japanese influence in design at the moment… a sense of calmness in the furniture pieces. Such as using a statement piece as the focal point instead of cluttering the room with different types of furniture pieces; 

Décor design is heading to a clean and minimalist approach,” says Roos

De Leeuw continues: “Less is more at the moment. Also, people are now more aware than ever and conscious of their environment… People are more aware of the fact that there is a serious water shortage problem.

“We recently did an event where the clients specifically asked for organic materials instead of flowers… which is rare;” she says 

joedan-7

About their bespoke pieces, Roos says they create functioning pieces meant to be admired.

“For us, it’s really about conceptualising a look for each event, tailoring it to fit in with your brand and vision. These days clients are so over-stimulated by picture-driven social media sites such as Pinterest and Instagram, that it’s key to get a sense of what the client wants and to interpret it in a way that communicates their vision and brand,” says Roos.

 

“Our aesthetic is calm, natural and none aggressive. We want the pieces in our collection to be calming in a sense and make it easy to fit any brief,” says Roos. 

 

The ottoman couch, sort of like a church bench meets a comfortable sofa, is a popular furniture piece at the moment. It’s slick, clean and a beautiful piece, says
Roos.

De Leeuw adds the niche market of interior design is so competitive that one has to stand out in order to survive.

“ You need to stand out, have a unique thing about you that will draw clients,”adds de Leeuw 

new-image

Tamara Chérie Spring/Summer 2016/2017

4.JPG

AWARD-WINNING designer, Tamara Chérie Dyson, has interned at Vivienne Westwood in London and won numerous design prizes, including the Elle Rising Star Design Award in 2014.

She started her design career last year building her brand and creating a successful diffusion line for Mr Price. In her relatively short career she has
been involved in fashion weeks such as Mercedes-Benz Africa Fashion Week
and Joburg Fashion Week.

3.JPG

Her collection reflects a balanced sense of timeless elegance and current intuitive design, focusing on achieving impeccable quality and the perfect fit.

Confident and sophisticated, the brand’s collections offer clients an investment wardrobe of discreet indulgence and understated, effortless style.

She recently launched her SS’17 collection which is available at various boutiques in Cape Town and Joburg and also on online shopping platform Spree. She describes her design process as “methodical”.

“I design key silhouettes that I feel every woman will want in their wardrobe that season and then I build on that. I don’t really follow trends and fads. I design then I will sometimes research detailing to add to the collection… I usually follow my heart and it
works,” she says

The Tamara Chérie woman she designs with in mind is “confident, sophisticated and believes in investing in pieces that transcends seasons and fads. A woman who believes in high quality, good designs and good fabrics”, she adds.

Eduan Roos Tamara Cherie and Leandri de Leeuw.JPG

CREATIVE: Eduan Roos, Tamara Chérie and Leandri de Leeuw collaborated for aCREATE and Chérie Spring/Summer 2016/2017.

Connect with with me on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat @Nontando58
● aCreate at http://www.acreate.co.za/
● Twitter: acreate_za
● INSTAGRAM: acreate_za
● Tamara Chérie Dyson: Instagram:
@TamaraChérieOfficial

This piece was first published in the Cape Argus on November 23 2016. 

 

Chef Matt Manning

image-by-hazel-mathias-photography-vinwoodI have never been a fan of sweet treats but when I had Chef Matt Manning’s  mini custard-filled doughnuts I couldn’t resist eating a handful of them. They are frosted with just the right amount of sugar and the dough is soft and flaky.

Manning is a private chef and the creator of One Ingredient  a monthly ‘pop up’ interactive dinner held at different venues in Cape Town which showcases the versatility of a single ingredient across five courses.

From the United Kingdom, Manning perfected his trade in some of London’s finest restaurants, such as the Michelin-starred Pétrus and Marcus. He also has worked with of the best in the business, including Gordon Ramsay, Marcus Wareing, Alyn Williams, James Knappet and Bryn Williams. I speak to him about his culinary journey and career highlights

How did you get into cooking? My grandmother was an excellent cook and had a passion for feeding her family. From an early age, I loved helping her in the kitchen. After completing my schooling, I was torn between studying engineering or the culinary arts – and I am glad I chose the latter. I spent some time in a kitchen in Norwich learning the basics before moving to London. There I was fortunate enough to spend time in Michelin-starred kitchens, and work under some of London’s most celebrated chefs. I later moved to South Africa where I spent some time at La Colombe restaurant before I decided to start my own thing – One Ingredient was born and the rest, as they say, is history.

Tell us a little about the “One Ingredient” concept and experience? One Ingredient is an interactive ‘pop up’ monthly dining experience and is designed for those who are as excited about what goes in to creating a beautiful dish, as they are about eating it. Every month I select one ingredient that features across five or six different courses (including canapés on arrival), each carefully paired with a premium wine from a partnering wine estate. The star ingredient is selected based on its versatility and seasonal availability. Only 20 seats are available per dinner, keeping the experience intimate but very festive.

Where do you get your inspiration?

“I am inspired by nature – ingredients that are seasonal and fresh always have the most flavour. There is no such thing as a bad ingredient – only a bad chef”

I always maintain that if you don’t like something, you haven’t yet enjoyed it in a way that resonates with you, and you should keep trying different variations until it does.

I am also inspired by some of our local talent – Cape Town-based chefs such as Neill Anthony and Liam Tomlin are doing fantastic things and pushing boundaries. I eat out a lot as I believe it is important to stay abreast of food trends. I also follow many international chefs on Snapchat and Instagram – be aware of what is happening across the global food scene, while remaining true to your own style.

image-by-cherith-anne-photography

The to die-for doughnuts. Photo by  Cherith Anne Photography

How has the food scene evolved since you started your career? There is definitely an increased emphasis on quality over quantity. People are more conscious of where the food comes from, how it is cultivated, and how it is prepared. There is an emphasis on sustainability. Nose-to-tail and farm-to-fork are dining philosophies we are seeing more of, for this very reason.

 

“This is inline with a growing global consciousness – we are more aware and concerned about the environment and the world around us, as well as how we nurture our own bodies”

We see a rise in the theatre of food. Boundary-pushing chefs are now offering multi-sensory menus and innovative dining experiences, and we are also see the kitchen become the ‘stage’ of many restaurants – opened right up so it is highly visible to patrons, well-lit and planted in the centre so they become a focal point of the dining experience.

There is also a narrowing of focus. In an era where we are inundated with options, people are wanting their food choices made simple. Restaurants that focus and specialise in a particular dish or ingredient- i.e. a burger or bacon – are springing up everywhere, and menus are slimming down. Some of the top restaurants now offer no more than five or six main course options. I think this is a fantastic thing – I firmly maintain that you are doing your customer a disservice if you offer an extensive menu – which means a pantry full of frozen dishes.

What do you think about the trend for all things organic? Organic produce is a good thing – the more naturally a vegetable or fruit is cultivated, the better for the environment and for us. What puts a lot of people off buying organic produce is the price – they tend to be more expensive. If you are on a budget but want to eat as naturally as possible, choose the organic option for vegetables such as carrots, potatoes, celery – anything where you consume the skin which has direct contact with the soil. Produce such as oranges and bananas have thicker skins which better shields them from chemicals. In a perfect world, we would only farm organically – but that is not yet a reality.

Ingredient obsession? It is hard to go wrong with real butter and Maldon salt flakes. I also love the freshness and zing lemon brings to a dish, so I always have some in my fruit bowl. Willocreek Olive Oil – a have an entire shelf at home filled with about 30 bottles as I have a pathological fear of running out – no jokes.

Do you have advice for young chefs today? Absorb as much as you can from those more experienced – you need to do your time in a decent kitchen and learn the rules. Creative license can only be applied when you know the rules backwards – only then do you have license to break them. You have to know the basics and be able to do them brilliantly before you should start experimenting with fusions and variations.

“Also travel – get as much exposure as possible to the different flavours and cultural traditions from all over the word. Broaden your mind and point of view – this can only help you in your work”

What’s next for you? I would love to own my own spot – not a restaurant, but an innovation lab-type space where I can create, experiment and reinvent. A venue where I can host my dinners, hold private functions, cooking classes, special once off experiences etc. That would be both my dream and my next step.

*For information on the next One Ingredient experience visit:
Website: http://www.matt-manning.com
Facebook: One Ingredient
Twitter: @MattManningChef
Instagram: mattmanningchef

Pic of Chef Matt Manning credit: Hazel Mathias Photography – Vinwood.

Connect with me on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat: @Nontando58

This piece was published in the Cape Argus on November 2 2016. 

 

 

Nontando Wore What?

tra_57354

I recently did a studio shoot with photographer Tracey Adams. We had a whole concept planned beforehand that included amazing makeup artistry but the plan fell apart at the last minute. The shoot went ahead and we managed to pull it off to produce some of our best work so far;-)

TRA_5748.JPG

If you follow me on social media you will know that I am a big Adidas fan and I am obsessed with socks. Combining the two, I came up with this clean and sassy looks.

TRA_5815.JPG I am a advocate of Proudly South African designers and African designers in general. Here I am wearing a gorgeous dress by Rich Mnisi that is available at Spree:  https://www.spree.co.za/

TRA_5828.JPG

I love everything about this shot. The Basotho traditional hat was just genius.

Connect with me on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat @Nontando58. 

Iintsizwa Ziphelele

PICTURE: UBUNTU

All pictures are by Ubuntu: Iintsizwa Ziphelel co-founder  Mogomotsi Magome and I. 

Quirky, quality clothing that celebrates the arts and the African culture and heritage is what the Iintsizwa Ziphelele brand is all about. Based in the vibrant and energetic township of Pimville in Soweto, Joburg, the label launched in 2006 and is recognised as one the coolest and oldest streetwear brands.

I meet co-owner Mogomotsi Magome  at their studio/factory early on a Monday morning as the township comes to life. The studio facing the street is a kaleidoscope of colour, displaying t-shirts , headwear, jackets and shirts in mixed prints and fabrics. Chatting over a breakfast of puffy amangwinya (vetkoek) and polony, Magome tells me that Iintsizwa Ziphelele, which loosely translated means Brotherhood, is a story of brothers united by their love for fashion and the arts.

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

Magome and his friend and business partner Mthunzi Nkosi met when they were studying at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT).

“We were studying things that had nothing to do with fashion. I was doing operational management and Nkosi was doing management services… very corporate stuff. We got involved in the arts such as poetry and over time an idea about having a clothing line came about and it wasn’t just him and I at the time, there were other friends involved,” he explains.

3.JPG

“The idea was to create a clothing label that we could identify with, away from mainstream and retail clothing. Mostly because we were in the arts and working with musicians and artists, we wanted to create a brand that people can identify with… an African brand but not your typical African. A blend of African prints mixed with modern styles and fabrics,” says Magome. 

Their signature t-shirts display cool graphics telling stories of African traditions, such as their popular t-shirt with the word “Lobola” on it. This in many African cultures, such as in the Zulu and Xhosa nations, is a price paid by the groom to the bride’s family before marriage.

“The name ‘Iintsizwa Ziphelele’ represents the principles of a brotherhood,” says Magome.

“When we were in tertiary, for a lot of us it was unchartered territory and for us to survive we had to stick together as a collection of friends. There has always been a necessity to keep brothers around, help each other to survive socially and otherwise. That bond that we formed gave birth to Iintsizwa Ziphelele and it has been like that ever since,” he says..

2.JPG

“In the beginning we were just printing t-shirts using a small one-colour screen printing machine, the most basic method of printing that you can use, in a garage. Back then the trend was to print political icons such as Steve Biko on t-shirts, it was about what was happening on the streets and people wanted to see that.

“As time went on we worked with graphic designers to create different kinds of images. It’s a big jump from where we were, we have now moved beyond t-shirts and are creating a variety of things,” says Magome.

5.JPG

Although the brand primarily produces menswear they also have a handful of women’s t-shirts and bucket hats on offer. During my visit I styled their menswear collection for their summer look-book. Their pieces, such as the camouflage shirt and sleeveless bomber jackets work as unisex pieces.

‘’The printed images on our clothing speak about life in the townships and homelands, and represent our daily reality as black peoples no matter where we are in the world. The brand celebrates Ubuntu and the last remnants of our cultures, post apartheid,” says Nkosi, who I interviewed later.

“Through the clothing we get to tell our stories. Fashion has played a role in defining people and eras, telling tales of different generations from the 1600s to the 80’s and now post slavery. We are inspired by the rich history that our country tells, the unique nation of this world – in fashion, music, languages and the different cultural exchanges that come from the different ethnic groups,” he says.

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

From humble beginnings to now having a fully functional mini factory at the back of their studio boasting the latest technology in printing, sewing and embroidery machines, the duo now employs young graduates and offer their services to other brands and organisations.
Not only is their clothing popular in KwaZulu-Natal, the Eastern Cape and Joburg, they also have clients overseas.

“The business is funding itself. What we did is to try and create a business model that can sustain the brand. The machines that we use to produce our brand, we also use them to produce printing services to other brands;

A lot of young brands get killed because it’s not that easy to get out there and make as many sales as possible and produce again. We had to find some innovative way of making it work,” Magome explains.

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

 

“Obviously growth is inevitable. Three years from now we should be in every corner of the country in department stores;

One of the business’s primary objectives is to create jobs for our people and play our part in this country’s economic growth, not only by enriching ourselves but by building our community here in Soweto,” adds Nkosi.

 

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

 

Connect with Iintsizwa Ziphelele on:

Facebook: Iintsizwa Ziphelele
Website: http://www.iintsizwa.com

This piece was first published in the Cape Argus on October 3 2016. Find me on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat: @Nontando58

 

Italian flair for Madiba Shirt

ivan-01596

The Presidential  brand is known for its luxurious, hand-painted silk batik prints and attention to detail at every level of each garment’s creation. But for the most part, it’s
known for its connection to Nelson Mandela.

Mandela made the “Presidential Shirt”, fondly known as the Madiba Shirt, world famous when he wore one presented to him by brand founder Desré Buirski following his election to office in 1994.  On Friday, Presidential embarked on a new direction with a debut women’s collection for the African queen.

The “Presidential Queen” AW17 collection, together with their latest menswear range, was unveiled at SA Fashion Week (SAFW) in Joburg’s Hyde Park Corner. Collaborating with Italian- born designer Pietro Giannuzzi, the presentation included 35 looks designed and made in South Africa.

dsc01393dsc01663

The intricate detailing of the embellishments, beadwork and embroidery on each garment was impressive, as models walked down the catwalk in exquisite gowns, bomber and biker jackets, kaftans, pants, and silk and cotton shirts in African and Eastern prints.

The collection showed African haute couture and ready-to-wear pieces could be mixed and matched separates or worn as sets.

Speaking after the show at a gathering of the Presidential team and special guests, brand founder Desré Buirski explained how Presidential was evolving to cater for men and women while sticking to its original aesthetic.

IVAN-01578.JPG

“I am so proud and so excited to be working with Giannuzzi… he is taking the brand to the next level. He is inspired by the brand and the history of the shirts being connected to the history of Madiba,” says Desré Buirski

“What is amazing is how he has managed to use our fabrics, not only combining Eastern fabrics with African, but also that he has brought in his Italian skill of design,”she says

“As much as he is proud to be associated with the brand, we are proud to have
him on board with us. The existing team will remain and the heart of the shirts will remain. However, as we grow we will add new collections;

“We are so proud that we can represent the country in such a beautiful way. We have been asked for years to produce womenswear and I never really wanted to do shirts for women as it was going to be too much of a duplication;

“We felt that this was the right time as we had Giannuzzi on board to bring in the Italian flavour with our fabrics, beaded details… the collection is absolutely stunning,” says Desré Buirski.

IVAN-01479.JPG

About his involvement, Giannuzzi says that being part of the already established brand as they embarked on a new journey and being entrusted with the task of producing the brand’s first women’s collection had been a huge honour.

“I was very proud to be asked to be part of the team and to design the ‘Presidential Queen’ collection. Before Presidential used to sell only shirts and now you can find jackets, dresses… It is a brand that is evolving;

“It is becoming younger, but is still inspired by the past and the great man Mandela,” says Pietro Giannuzzi.

Another milestone for Presidential is the bulk of their production is now being done by a local factory, thereby playing a big role in supporting the local fashion industry.

“Presidential Group took a decision to make the Presidential Shirt range in
South Africa two years ago. Before that, the shirts were made abroad, now 80 percent of the shirts are made in Cape Town at Lontana Clothing.

“Our support of the factory has ensured it has continued operations in a very challenging economic environment,” he says.

“The craftwork in our range showcases South African talent. The skills are here, they just need to be found, harnessed and given an opportunity to shine,”says Pietro Giannuzzi

IVAN-01450.JPG

Buirski adds: “What is also fabulous for us is that we are not just aiming to be a wonderful brand, we want to keep Nelson Mandela’s legacy alive. And in order to do that, it is not just by wearing shirts and these beautiful fabrics, but to actually create jobs by giving local
fashion a bit of a boost.

“We are still doing all the shirts and we will keep the shirts coming in all different styles and fabrics, but adding other pieces makes the collection a bit broader.

“We felt that this was the right time because the brand needed to evolve and we would really love at some point to take the brand to the rest of Africa”

“But we first had to introduce the new collection because this is the heartbeat of our home and the heartbeat of Nelson Mandela,” says Buirski.

Celebrities and fashion influencers who attended the Presidential showcase included stylist Dumi Gwebu, TV presenter Mthoko Mkhathini and a photographer from According To Jerri, who all wore printed Madiba Shirts.

dsc01610DSC01509.jpgdsc01502dsc01662

 

Pietro Giannuzzi and Desre Buirski.JPG

The Presidential team:  Pietro Giannuzzi and Desré Buirski.

Connect with them at :Website: http://www.presidential.co.za
Instagram: @presidentialshirt
Facebook: Presidential Shirt
Twitter: @presidentialAfr

This piece was first published in the Cape Argus on September 28 2016. 

Spring/ Summer #MBFWJ16 top trends

 

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

Designer: Adama Paris Studio. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

I  have rounded up some of the hottest trends straight from the runway of the
Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Joburg (MBFWJ), held in Sandton last week. Identify and style them to suit your personality.

1 Nandi Mngoma x Inga Madyibi
Designer: Nandi Mngoma x Inga Madyibi. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

1. The Jumpsuit: A tailored jumpsuit can seamlessly take you from the office to a black-tie gala event. No matter the occasion, there’s always a look you can pull off by wearing one. Choose a one-colour jumpsuit or one in print, such as the Nandi Mngoma and Inga Madyibi tribal print jumpsuit. Alter your accessories, chunky or barely-there, and heel height to suit the occasion.

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

Designer: Orapeleng Modutle Style. Picture by Rizqua Barnes

2.Couture Chic: If you enjoy dressing up then this trend will be right up your alley. Orapeleng Modutle Style Avenue showcased a collection to die for. His attention to detail and fit is superb, and using luxury fabrics such as chiffon, each piece is delicately put together. This trend will work for a day at the races, a fancy evening party and is for those who are willing to spend a little more on boutique clothing.

3. Head wraps: Head-turning head wraps and head scarves remain the hottest hair accessory. The bigger, the better, just make sure it is neatly wrapped. Adama Paris Studio paired her clashing prints collection with brightly coloured head wraps and bold make-up.

4 Khosi Nkosi

Designer: Khosi Nkosi. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

4. Prints: This is another trend that is not going to disappear any time soon. Deviating from her usual all-prints collections that celebrate the nubian woman, Khosi Nkosi presented a collection that mixed ethnic prints with modern fabrics. From African to geometric prints, play around by mixing them with different fabrics such as faux leather and denim.

5 Tina Lobondi
Designer:  Tina Lobondi. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

5.Athleisure is anything from designer leggings paired with high heels to feminine
dresses with fabrics such as denim or faux leather. The trend is being driven by people who are looking for more functionality from their wardrobe and who do not want to compromise on style for comfort. Tina Lobondi styled this printed short jumpsuit with a pair of trendy sneakers… a perfect look for a day on your feet.

Processed with VSCO with acg preset

Designer: Marianne Fasser. Picture by Rizqua Barnes

6. Sheer clothing: Wearing sheer fabrics such as delicate chiffon, mesh and lace are best for showing some skin during the summer months. Consider a dress that features a section of sheer fabric, such as this elegant Marianne Fassler dress, right. The trick is to stick to dark colours.

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat at @Nontando58

*This piece was first published in The Cape Argus and The Star on August 19 2016.