SA Menswear Week, highlights so far.

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A Chulaap by Chu Suwannapha design  showcased at Season 1. Photo by SIMON DEINER/SDR

Seeing a gap in the fast-growing category of menswear, fashion photographer Simon Deiner and businessman Ryan Beswick developed a platform that is now responsible for promoting menswear designers in Africa. Entering its fifth season, the LEXUS SA Menswear Week (Lexus SAMW AW’17) is the only menswear-focused fashion week on the continent.

Over the past four seasons, we have had an opportunity to witness some of the best in menswear by both emerging and established designers from around Africa, some of whom have gone on to gain international exposure. Rich Mnis, Jenevieve Lyons, Chu Suwannapha, Craig Jacobs, Orange Culture and Laduma Ngxokolo are now recognised internationally.
My highlights include the debut range of Chulaap by Chu Suwannapha showcased at season one. The styling, design and the prints show Suwannapha’s artistic aesthetic and his love for the colourful African continent.

Lukhanyo Mdingi’s androgynous collection of dark navy, blue and black made up of sheer silk and denim separates from season two remain fresh in my mind. The range brought forth the growing trend of gender-fluid fashion. The collaboration of Adriaan Kuiters and Jod Paulsen (AKJP) from season three showed that a meeting of two creative minds can lead to magic.

Lukhanyo Mdingi
A design by Lukhanyo Mdingi. Picture by : SIMON DEINER/SDR PHOTO
For Deiner, there have been many highlights: “I remember the first season where we did a team photo at the end and there were about 50 people involved. And when we took the group photo at the SS17 collections last July we had just over 150 people in the pic. “Other highlights have been watching our young designers shine and grow into proper household names and along the way start businesses. I have also enjoyed seeing how men in general now perceive the concept of wearing locally made clothing as something they are proud to do,” Deiner says.
A lot of hard work and dedication are necessary for a designer to stand out from a saturated industry competing against cheap imports and fast fashion. Funding, production and affordable and quality fabrics are just some of the challenges that our young designers are facing, which play a hand in preventing them from maintaining profitable businesses.
Kim Gush
Kim Gush by SIMON DEINER/SDR PHOTO
Kim Gush, owner and designer of Kim Gush apparel, adds: “I think local consumers still love to compare designers to big retailers, especially where price is concerned. We are still constantly faced with the snub at our price tags… consumers forget that the items aren’t mass produced, therefore you are receiving a unique piece. And at the same time you are supporting our local manufacturing industry – which to be honest, needs every tiny purchase to try to revive it.
“Buying local means you are helping in developing and bringing our industry to those ‘international’ levels you so dearly desire as well as keeping jobs going,” she says. “Take the time to get to know all those brands you watch at fashion week. A lot of people are just there for the social, but they forget the heart and soul that goes into every garment presented, the dreams the designers have for this industry to flourish,” she says. 
For Suwannapha, who will not be showcasing at Lexus SAMW AW’17, the fabrication and the manufacturing are problematic. “Hopefully, some of the courier companies will work with fabrics agencies towards bringing fabrics to minimal costs, or I might have to live with the high labour costs as long as I’m producing in South Africa,” he says. “(This year) is all about expanding and building my brand. Collaboration will be a part of my brand’s personality, which will be coming soon and will be available online in South Africa,” Suwannapha says.
FB  Pic 3  The collaboration of Adriaan Kuiters x Jod Paulsen from season 3.jpg
The collaboration of Adriaan Kuiters and Jod Paulsen from season three. Picture: SIMON DEINER/SDR PHOTO
One of the youngest showcasing designers, Mzukisi Mbane of Imprint, adds: “When it comes to fashion week, I think we all take away what we want from it.“The fashion week benefits should always extend beyond the applause after a runway show. For instance, you get an opportunity to sell yourself to a wide audience that you wouldn’t normally be able to reach. “After my first runway show, I got invited to go to Ghana then Nigeria… I was instantly not just a South African brand, but a recognised African brand,”says Mbane.
Imprint
A Imprint by Mzukisi Mbane design. Picture by SIMON DEINER/SDR PHOTO
On what to expect at his showcase next week: “The collection is based on a fictional character I created. It’s an Ndebele man who decided to leave home and travel the world.
“The collection includes a lot of colour, oversized silhouettes, genderfluid pieces. Which is truly the Imprint Afro futuristic aesthetic… it expresses a free spirit which challenges made-up perfection. “As the collection is titled “I couldn’t be bothered”, one will take away whatever they want from the collection… and that will be okay,” he adds.
LEXUS SA Menswear Week will take place at The Palms in Woodstock on February 3 and 4 2017.
Tickets are available at http://www.webtickets.co.za.For a full schedule see : http://www.menswearweek.co.za/
See more of my work here: http://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/style

Connect with me on Instagram and Twitter: @Nontando58 https://www.instagram.com/nontando58/?hl=en

This piece was first published in the Weekend Argus (Sunday) on January 29 2017. 

Racing Season is officially underway

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At the L’Ormarins Queen’s Plate (LQP) on January 7 slaying in a Nontando original siShweshwe outfit. 

Cape Town’s horse racing season is in full swing.The season began with the L’Ormarins Queen’s Plate (LQP)  glitzy blue and white themed two day affair that was held in the first weekend of January. As one of Cape Town’s Racing .It’s a Rush ambassador and guest, my friends and I spent the day at the Paddock Marquee , mingling with South Africa’s who-is-who in entertainment, the social scene and celebrities. Part of the fun is also sipping on champagne, eating delicious canapes and also placing a bet. Although most of us are there to show off our outfits and to slay. However, we do take the time to watch the country’s finest thoroughbred horses compete for a large amount of money…in between taking countless selfies and photos…of course;-) We placed bets worth about a R100 but we didn’t win…we are still a long way from becoming professional punters. 

Here is a breakdown of the winners:
– Winner of the MAINE CHANCE FARMS PADDOCK STAKES (WFA) (Grade 1) (For Fillies and Mares ) was Bela-Bela trained by Justin Snaith and Anton   Marcus.
– Winner of the L’ORMARINS QUEEN’S PLATE (WFA) (Grade 1) was Legal Eagle trained by Sean Tarry and the jockey Anton Marcus 
– Jockey Anton Marcus rode 4 winners on the the day! 

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If you do not take a picture with this LQPCT floral decorated sign, you were not there.

Take note of the blue and white theme as it’s there for a reason. To those who showed up dressed in colours outside the theme, STOP IT!!!! You are ruining a tradition that has been there for decades and not just our pictures with your red or mustard outfits. 

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My friend Hubert won the best dressed man title. Rightfully earned and deserved, he looked dapper and his attention to detail is on point. Gentleman!! Take notes. 

SUN MET CELEBRATED WITH MUMM 2.jpg“Sun Met celebrated with Mumm” The picture is supplied. 

Coming up next week  is the inaugural Sun Met celebrated with Mumm event which has been hailed as the “the richest horse racing day in Africa”. I am looking forward to this event. Hey now,  I do enjoy good champagne. So the thought of spending the whole day sipping on unlimited G. H. Mumm, eating good food in good company sounds like the perfect day to me.

The theme is “ “Decades of glamour” which means that we are  spoilt for choice when it comes to what to wear on the day. 

Here is a breakdown of the theme to help you put together the perfect race day outfit

Theme: “Decades of Glamour”: 

  •  1920’s – The Great Gatsby: an era of feminine self- expression where waists dropped and hemlines rose. The Flapper look was the rage, with long necklaces, cloche hats and chemise or shift dresses storming to the fore.  
  •         1930’s – Vintage: known as the Golden Age of Glamour for women’s fashion an era of escapism and glamourous Hollywood starlets. Favouring simple art deco lines the style moved to smaller cloche hats, skirt hems dropped and broad shouldered, puffed sleeves entered the fray.
  •         1940’s – Retro: A decade defined by the war years, the padded or puffed shoulder was the dominant look. The Silhouette with broad square shoulders and trim waist and hips was desired. This was complimented by tiny hats, large bags and nylon stockings.
  •         1950’s – Polka Dots: This decade is influenced by two silhouettes, the wide circle skirt and the pencil skirt. Ball gowns were complimented by elbow length gloves and sparkling jewelry. Summer dresses also incorporated floral and polka dot prints. Chanel introduced suit jackets and slim skirts in highly textured tweeds.
  •         1960’s – Flower Power: The era where no skirt was too short brought the arrival of the mini skirt and hot pants. The hippy revolution was about long hair, long legs and long nights. Bellbottoms bubbled to the surface. The swinging sixties were defined by a number of icons from the gamine supermodel Twiggy to the “original” first lady Jackie Kennedy who brought us skirt suits, pillbox hats and supersized sunglasses.
  •         1970’s – Disco: This decade was all about “freedom”, “identity” and “personal expression”. The hippie culture continued and fashion resulting from this period displayed rebellion. From mini-skirts to wide lapel suits, knee high boots and lace onsie’s the 70’s had it all.
  •         1980’s – Glam Rock: One word comes to mind when you think of 80’s : BIG. It was a time of excess and over-the-top flamboyance. Shows like Dallas and Dynasty depicted bedazzled evening wear studded with sequins and beads. Metallic dress colours like silver and gold also added some shine to this decade.
  •         1990’s – Denim: This decade saw a return to minimalist fashion. Supermodels such as Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell and Eva Herzigovatowered over the fashion industry during this period. Tailored skirt and trouser suits, short skirts and dresses, baby doll dresses, animal prints, hot pants, slim pants and high heels. High shine fabrics such as satin, metallic, sequins, vinyl and silk were prominent.
  •         2000’s – Modern Fashion: An era epitomised by style icons such as J. Lo saw fashion trends such as the boyfriend blazer, statement necklaces paired with classic sheath dresses, skyscraper platform shoes, miniskirts, mix and match prints and cocktail rings.

 

*Useful links for more informarion. Sun Met: www.sunmet.co.za

Twitter: @SunMetZA and Instagram: @officalsunmet

Hashtag:  #DAREWINCELEBRATE

*All you need to know about racing and racing events: Racing.It’s A Rush. http://www.itsarush.co.za

Instagram: @racingitsarush and Twitter: @RacingGuru

 

Connect with me on Instagram and Twitter: @Nontando58

 

 

 

Living in colour…

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I took up the Fruit of the Loom South Africa “colour blocking challenge” with Zando and this is what I came up with. What do you guys think? I styled their t-shirts by wearing all four in one…I bet you haven’t seen basic t-shirts styled in this way before;-) The blue lipstick is from M.A.C .

Summer is here Fashionistas and it’s time to stand out in colourful clothing. I love colour and prints, no matter what the season is. From bright lipsticks to clothing and sneakers…gimme, gimme colour any day!!!

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#NontandoWoreWhat The mandarin jacket is a Nontando original (yes, I design my own clothes. Look out for my label soon)

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Credits: Pictures are by Khuthii @Khuthii on Instagram.

Location: The beautiful Lourensford Estate

Connnect with me on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat @Nontando58

 

 

When fashion meets decor

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Eduan Roos, Tamara Chérie and Leandri de Leeuw collaborated for aCREATE and Chérie Spring/Summer 2016/2017. PICTURES: JOE DAN PHOTOGRAPHY

COLLABORATION is now a common buzzword in fashion, art and design. Brands,
creatives and influencers are coming together to share ideas… curating content that is specifically relevant for their consumers.

The latest collaboration is between creative décor specialists, Eduan Roos and Leandri de Leeuw of aCREATE, an award-winning contemporary readyto- wear brand, Tamara Chérie. The collaboration, which was part of aCREATE and Chérie Spring/Summer2016/17 showcase titled “A Common Thread”, was presented at the Roodebloem Studios in Woodstock last month. It saw the coming together of interior design and fashion in a beautifully curated way.

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The two brands’ aesthetic of muted palettes and minimal styles complemented each other well, expressing clean lines and refined silhouettes articulate in a chic modern attitude.

Previously part of The Aleit Group , Roos and De Leeuw recently ventured out on their own to form aCREATE, and over the past months have made a name for themselves as the go-to-designers for bespoke event experiences in Cape Town and Joburg. Their furniture pieces offer customised décor and accessories that interpret their vision for each unique
event.

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The local events industry has evolved over the years, with clients now demanding service that not only sets them apart, but also delivers enduring memories for their guests, Roos explains when I met him and De Leeuw at Chérie’s studio in Gardens.

Roos, a fashion designer by profession, says the slow living trend has spilled over from lifestyle to décor and design.

“There is a big Japanese influence in design at the moment… a sense of calmness in the furniture pieces. Such as using a statement piece as the focal point instead of cluttering the room with different types of furniture pieces; 

Décor design is heading to a clean and minimalist approach,” says Roos

De Leeuw continues: “Less is more at the moment. Also, people are now more aware than ever and conscious of their environment… People are more aware of the fact that there is a serious water shortage problem.

“We recently did an event where the clients specifically asked for organic materials instead of flowers… which is rare;” she says 

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About their bespoke pieces, Roos says they create functioning pieces meant to be admired.

“For us, it’s really about conceptualising a look for each event, tailoring it to fit in with your brand and vision. These days clients are so over-stimulated by picture-driven social media sites such as Pinterest and Instagram, that it’s key to get a sense of what the client wants and to interpret it in a way that communicates their vision and brand,” says Roos.

 

“Our aesthetic is calm, natural and none aggressive. We want the pieces in our collection to be calming in a sense and make it easy to fit any brief,” says Roos. 

 

The ottoman couch, sort of like a church bench meets a comfortable sofa, is a popular furniture piece at the moment. It’s slick, clean and a beautiful piece, says
Roos.

De Leeuw adds the niche market of interior design is so competitive that one has to stand out in order to survive.

“ You need to stand out, have a unique thing about you that will draw clients,”adds de Leeuw 

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Tamara Chérie Spring/Summer 2016/2017

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AWARD-WINNING designer, Tamara Chérie Dyson, has interned at Vivienne Westwood in London and won numerous design prizes, including the Elle Rising Star Design Award in 2014.

She started her design career last year building her brand and creating a successful diffusion line for Mr Price. In her relatively short career she has
been involved in fashion weeks such as Mercedes-Benz Africa Fashion Week
and Joburg Fashion Week.

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Her collection reflects a balanced sense of timeless elegance and current intuitive design, focusing on achieving impeccable quality and the perfect fit.

Confident and sophisticated, the brand’s collections offer clients an investment wardrobe of discreet indulgence and understated, effortless style.

She recently launched her SS’17 collection which is available at various boutiques in Cape Town and Joburg and also on online shopping platform Spree. She describes her design process as “methodical”.

“I design key silhouettes that I feel every woman will want in their wardrobe that season and then I build on that. I don’t really follow trends and fads. I design then I will sometimes research detailing to add to the collection… I usually follow my heart and it
works,” she says

The Tamara Chérie woman she designs with in mind is “confident, sophisticated and believes in investing in pieces that transcends seasons and fads. A woman who believes in high quality, good designs and good fabrics”, she adds.

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CREATIVE: Eduan Roos, Tamara Chérie and Leandri de Leeuw collaborated for aCREATE and Chérie Spring/Summer 2016/2017.

Connect with with me on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat @Nontando58
● aCreate at http://www.acreate.co.za/
● Twitter: acreate_za
● INSTAGRAM: acreate_za
● Tamara Chérie Dyson: Instagram:
@TamaraChérieOfficial

This piece was first published in the Cape Argus on November 23 2016. 

 

Iintsizwa Ziphelele

PICTURE: UBUNTU

All pictures are by Ubuntu: Iintsizwa Ziphelel co-founder  Mogomotsi Magome and I. 

Quirky, quality clothing that celebrates the arts and the African culture and heritage is what the Iintsizwa Ziphelele brand is all about. Based in the vibrant and energetic township of Pimville in Soweto, Joburg, the label launched in 2006 and is recognised as one the coolest and oldest streetwear brands.

I meet co-owner Mogomotsi Magome  at their studio/factory early on a Monday morning as the township comes to life. The studio facing the street is a kaleidoscope of colour, displaying t-shirts , headwear, jackets and shirts in mixed prints and fabrics. Chatting over a breakfast of puffy amangwinya (vetkoek) and polony, Magome tells me that Iintsizwa Ziphelele, which loosely translated means Brotherhood, is a story of brothers united by their love for fashion and the arts.

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

Magome and his friend and business partner Mthunzi Nkosi met when they were studying at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT).

“We were studying things that had nothing to do with fashion. I was doing operational management and Nkosi was doing management services… very corporate stuff. We got involved in the arts such as poetry and over time an idea about having a clothing line came about and it wasn’t just him and I at the time, there were other friends involved,” he explains.

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“The idea was to create a clothing label that we could identify with, away from mainstream and retail clothing. Mostly because we were in the arts and working with musicians and artists, we wanted to create a brand that people can identify with… an African brand but not your typical African. A blend of African prints mixed with modern styles and fabrics,” says Magome. 

Their signature t-shirts display cool graphics telling stories of African traditions, such as their popular t-shirt with the word “Lobola” on it. This in many African cultures, such as in the Zulu and Xhosa nations, is a price paid by the groom to the bride’s family before marriage.

“The name ‘Iintsizwa Ziphelele’ represents the principles of a brotherhood,” says Magome.

“When we were in tertiary, for a lot of us it was unchartered territory and for us to survive we had to stick together as a collection of friends. There has always been a necessity to keep brothers around, help each other to survive socially and otherwise. That bond that we formed gave birth to Iintsizwa Ziphelele and it has been like that ever since,” he says..

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“In the beginning we were just printing t-shirts using a small one-colour screen printing machine, the most basic method of printing that you can use, in a garage. Back then the trend was to print political icons such as Steve Biko on t-shirts, it was about what was happening on the streets and people wanted to see that.

“As time went on we worked with graphic designers to create different kinds of images. It’s a big jump from where we were, we have now moved beyond t-shirts and are creating a variety of things,” says Magome.

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Although the brand primarily produces menswear they also have a handful of women’s t-shirts and bucket hats on offer. During my visit I styled their menswear collection for their summer look-book. Their pieces, such as the camouflage shirt and sleeveless bomber jackets work as unisex pieces.

‘’The printed images on our clothing speak about life in the townships and homelands, and represent our daily reality as black peoples no matter where we are in the world. The brand celebrates Ubuntu and the last remnants of our cultures, post apartheid,” says Nkosi, who I interviewed later.

“Through the clothing we get to tell our stories. Fashion has played a role in defining people and eras, telling tales of different generations from the 1600s to the 80’s and now post slavery. We are inspired by the rich history that our country tells, the unique nation of this world – in fashion, music, languages and the different cultural exchanges that come from the different ethnic groups,” he says.

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

From humble beginnings to now having a fully functional mini factory at the back of their studio boasting the latest technology in printing, sewing and embroidery machines, the duo now employs young graduates and offer their services to other brands and organisations.
Not only is their clothing popular in KwaZulu-Natal, the Eastern Cape and Joburg, they also have clients overseas.

“The business is funding itself. What we did is to try and create a business model that can sustain the brand. The machines that we use to produce our brand, we also use them to produce printing services to other brands;

A lot of young brands get killed because it’s not that easy to get out there and make as many sales as possible and produce again. We had to find some innovative way of making it work,” Magome explains.

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

 

“Obviously growth is inevitable. Three years from now we should be in every corner of the country in department stores;

One of the business’s primary objectives is to create jobs for our people and play our part in this country’s economic growth, not only by enriching ourselves but by building our community here in Soweto,” adds Nkosi.

 

PICTURE: UBUNTU

PICTURE: UBUNTU

 

Connect with Iintsizwa Ziphelele on:

Facebook: Iintsizwa Ziphelele
Website: http://www.iintsizwa.com

This piece was first published in the Cape Argus on October 3 2016. Find me on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat: @Nontando58

 

Celebrating Tourism Month

Archery in Parys

Trying my hand in Archiery at the Real adventures place in Parys, Free State province. Picture:Paballo Thekiso

My first road trip was with three of myvfriends. We planned the trip from Durban to Cape
Town in three months. We were young and carefree. We divided the trip into two parts with an overnight stay in Knysna.

For dinner we ate sushi for the first time, in a restaurant by the harbour. This was followed by a late night of drinking at the bar at the backpackers’ where we were staying before stumbling to our four-bunk bedroom in the early hours.

The next morning on the road was rough, we were tired, hungover and excited at the same time about reaching Cape Town. We arrived just before sunset at the Green Elephant backpackers in Observatory, our home for four nights.

The staff welcomed us with open arms and we formed friendships that are still alive today. We spent the days sightseeing in the CBD, shopping at the V&A Waterfront, sipping cocktails in Camps Bay and driving up Signal Hill.

2. Quad Biking in ParysPicture:Paballo Thekiso

The nights were spent playing pool in Lower Main Road Observatory and club-hopping in Long Street. Without realising it until the last night, we had spent most of our petrol money. Our parents came to our rescue, but not before scolding us for our irresponsible
behaviour. Memories from that trip remain fresh in my mind.

What made the trip extra special was we managed to save the little money we had at the time for an adventure that would see the four of us bonding… we learnt a lot about each other during the long drive in a small Corsa.

“I would like to think this trip ignited a lust for travel in each of us”

Since then, the four of us have travelled extensively in South Africa, as well as in Europe and the US. Contrary to what some might believe, one does not require a fat bank balanceto be able to travel, be it local or international. However, some saving and smart planning is key.

Common sense goes a long way. For example, buying a plane ticket a few months before you travel will be cheaper than booking the flight the day before you are due to travel.

In the past, I have taken the Greyhound bus to Durban to visit my family and overland trucks to Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe and Namibia for holidays. The experiences are priceless.

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Queening with the BaSotho women dressed in their traditional wear called Thebetha

“Venturing out of your comfort zone and learning about other people and cultures will teach you things about yourself and the world you won’t find in a textbook”

 

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Enjoying a sunset cruise on the Vaal River. Picture by Paballo Thekiso.

One of my favourite Sho’t Left (domestic travels) trip include a visit to Joburg where I caught up with friends and family. On a recent trip there I spent a weekend in Soweto, which is home to some of South Africa’s world famous names, such as Nelson Mandela, and is known for history changing moments such as the 1976 Soweto student uprising.

During my stay there I visited the Mandela house in Vilakazi Street, a buzzing street lined with restaurants and cafés… a not so common sight for a township. There is an electrifying energy that hangs in the air that when I left, I felt empty .

Recently I paid a visit to my home town, but opted to stay at a hotel in the city centre instead of home as they were busy renovating. I saw Durban through the eyes of a tourist for the first time and I became one.

I visited art galleries, museums, took long leisurely walks on the beachfront promenade and discovered cafés where I spent hours watching people. I returned with a new-found appreciation for the city where people have no whims about striking up conversations with strangers. I realised how much I missed this simple act of ubuntu (human kindness) that is still alive there.

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Last week I spent a week in the Free State visiting several towns. It was my first time there and I experienced a number of firsts. I learnt about towns I never knew existed, such as Vredefort near Parys.

I quad biked, I tried my hand at archery and went river rafting on the Vaal River. All these sporting activities were never on my to-do-list of fun things while on a holiday before this trip.

1. L-R Liam Joyce and Nontando Mposo river rafting in the Vaal RiverLiam and I slaying. Picture:Paballo Thekiso

September is tourism month, an annual celebration focusing on the importance of tourism for the economy. The theme for this year is Tourism For All: Promoting Universal Accessibility.

It aims to encourage everyone to explore and rediscover our country. So, round up a group of friends or family for a Sho’t Left somewhere.

Visit:www@shotleft.co.za for more travel inspiration. 

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Connect with me and follow my adventures on Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat @Nontando58. 

This feature was first published in the Cape Argus on September 2016. 

 

Spring/ Summer #MBFWJ16 top trends

 

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Designer: Adama Paris Studio. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

I  have rounded up some of the hottest trends straight from the runway of the
Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Joburg (MBFWJ), held in Sandton last week. Identify and style them to suit your personality.

1 Nandi Mngoma x Inga Madyibi
Designer: Nandi Mngoma x Inga Madyibi. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

1. The Jumpsuit: A tailored jumpsuit can seamlessly take you from the office to a black-tie gala event. No matter the occasion, there’s always a look you can pull off by wearing one. Choose a one-colour jumpsuit or one in print, such as the Nandi Mngoma and Inga Madyibi tribal print jumpsuit. Alter your accessories, chunky or barely-there, and heel height to suit the occasion.

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Designer: Orapeleng Modutle Style. Picture by Rizqua Barnes

2.Couture Chic: If you enjoy dressing up then this trend will be right up your alley. Orapeleng Modutle Style Avenue showcased a collection to die for. His attention to detail and fit is superb, and using luxury fabrics such as chiffon, each piece is delicately put together. This trend will work for a day at the races, a fancy evening party and is for those who are willing to spend a little more on boutique clothing.

3. Head wraps: Head-turning head wraps and head scarves remain the hottest hair accessory. The bigger, the better, just make sure it is neatly wrapped. Adama Paris Studio paired her clashing prints collection with brightly coloured head wraps and bold make-up.

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Designer: Khosi Nkosi. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

4. Prints: This is another trend that is not going to disappear any time soon. Deviating from her usual all-prints collections that celebrate the nubian woman, Khosi Nkosi presented a collection that mixed ethnic prints with modern fabrics. From African to geometric prints, play around by mixing them with different fabrics such as faux leather and denim.

5 Tina Lobondi
Designer:  Tina Lobondi. Picture by Rizqua Barnes.

5.Athleisure is anything from designer leggings paired with high heels to feminine
dresses with fabrics such as denim or faux leather. The trend is being driven by people who are looking for more functionality from their wardrobe and who do not want to compromise on style for comfort. Tina Lobondi styled this printed short jumpsuit with a pair of trendy sneakers… a perfect look for a day on your feet.

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Designer: Marianne Fasser. Picture by Rizqua Barnes

6. Sheer clothing: Wearing sheer fabrics such as delicate chiffon, mesh and lace are best for showing some skin during the summer months. Consider a dress that features a section of sheer fabric, such as this elegant Marianne Fassler dress, right. The trick is to stick to dark colours.

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat at @Nontando58

*This piece was first published in The Cape Argus and The Star on August 19 2016.